HIV, diversity and cultural competence

HIV, diversity and cultural competence

National Centre for Social Research in Health, University of New South Wales Sydney

Cross-cultural issues are a reality and a challenge for public sector agencies seeking to meet their responsibilities in an increasingly diverse Australia. ‘Cross-cultural training’ of various kinds has been part of the ‘tool box’ to address these challenges. This is a brief on the more comprehensive framework of ‘cultural competence’.

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National Centre for Cultural Competence

National Centre for Cultural Competence

Georgetown University, Washington DC

The National Centre for Cultural Competence (NCCC) provides national leadership and contributes to the body of knowledge on cultural and linguistic competency within systems and organizations. Major emphasis is placed on translating evidence into policy and practice for programs and personnel concerned with health and mental health care delivery, administration, education and advocacy.

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Estimating the size of priority populations

Cultural competency in health: A guide for policy, partnerships and participation

The National Health and Medical Research Council

All Australians have the right to access health care that meets their needs. In our culturally and linguistically diverse society, this right can only be upheld if cultural issues are core business at every level of the health system— systemic, organisational, professional and individual. This guide is one step towards this goal, giving a model for cultural competency that can be applied by health systems and organisations to improve health for all.

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Estimating the size of priority populations

Estimating the size of priority populations

NSW STI Programs Unit

These guidelines are intended to assist services to establish goals and targets in relation to access by priority populations. Estimating the size of priority populations is an important first step. However, it is not always easy to do so. Some approaches to do this are described below, as well as the limitations in estimating the size of some priority population groups.

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